Burnt Men, by Oluwasegun Romeo Oriogun

0.00

Oluwasegun Romeo Oriogun’s poetry confronts what is haunting, what is debilitating, what is most precious, and presents it to us gloriously and with absolute honesty. And whether his primary subject is politics, spirituality, or the sensual (all are present in nearly every poem), he does so with such mastery, such originality, that on first reading it was difficult for me to not just forge ahead mining for the gems I knew were there. And while there are many from which to choose, these lines from Maps represent a prime example of that marriage between the political and the spiritual, swaddled in Oriogun’s sensuality.

Oluwasegun Romeo Oriogun’s poetry confronts what is haunting, what is debilitating, what is most precious, and presents it to us gloriously and with absolute honesty. And whether his primary subject is politics, spirituality, or the sensual (all are present in nearly every poem), he does so with such mastery, such originality, that on first reading it was difficult for me to not just forge ahead mining for the gems I knew were there. And while there are many from which to choose, these lines from Maps represent a prime example of that marriage between the political and the spiritual, swaddled in Oriogun’s sensuality.